Desserts on the fire – Malva Pudding

We left Cape Town late so couldn’t make it to the Karoo and found this beautiful spot in Ceres called Petervale farm.  A magical spot for kids!

Who says that all you can have while camping in remote beautiful places is chocolate or toasted marshmallows? Both are a winner, but sometimes there is nothing better than a yummy hot pudding.  I am by no means a chef or cook extraordinaire but the reason I do these cooking posts, and pretty much all our camping posts, is to hopefully inspire.  There is so much more that can be done than what we may have experienced that one really bad camping trip.  So with all my blogs, I hope to show you that the average family, like us, can do some amazing things.  And that camping doesn’t mean limitations to what we eat either.  That you don’t have to be a whiz, but you can do some delicious simple meals and puddings.  So this brings me to this post.

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En route to the Tankwa we found Bushman painting just off the road

One of my favorites is malva pudding. It is a true South African winner of all things yummy, gooey and tasty. Think hot sticky toffee pudding but creamier. So I got to thinking after baking bread (beer bread recipe) and apple crumble on the fire (crumble recipe), why not other puddings? It’s creature comforts like these that can just make your trip feel a little bit like home and bring you that comfort.

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So on our last trip to the Tankwa Karoo, I roped in my friend Wendy to assist with my first attempt at Malva Pudding on the fire. She is a cook extraordinaire, so always good to have someone like that as your sidekick. It was pretty chaotic with trying to braai dinner and keep hungry kids at bay. It is not a great pudding to do if you are setting up camp due to having quite a few elements to oversee.  It would work better if you have time, so a spot where you are in camp for a few hours before dinner would be ideal and also when someone else will be overseeing the dinner.

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At the top of the Ganaga Pass in the Tankwa Karoo National Park

What you will need:

A fire with lots of coals

This is because it will need 45-60mins on the fire and you need to rotate coals. Also helpful to heat some rocks in the fire that you can put them around the side of the pot furthest from the fire to heat up the sides of the pot.  Also have a few smaller stones so that the pot is slightly off the coals which helps to prevent ‘hotspots’ and burning.

You will need a few slightly higher stones to rest your pot on.  Be careful to only put a few coals underneath – you will need less than you think.

A dish that can go on the fire

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When cooking on the fire a flat bottomed cast iron pot is pretty ideal.  They are very heavy, so not always the most ideal things to take along.  We always take our cast iron bread pot as it isn’t too big and our flat bottomed aluminium pot which works as my larger dish for rice, pasta etc.  So far I have found that cast iron is definitely the best way to go on the fire.

For this attempt the cast iron bread pot was too small, so I used our aluminium flat based pot.  It gets hot a lot quicker, so you have to watch the coals and keep rotating it regularly.  It is also a lot thinner, so can tend to burn very easily.

Your favorite Malva Pudding Recipe

I use one a friend of mine suggested but I wasn’t going to type it all out, so here is one I found if you need one (recipe link)


INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup castor sugar
  • 2 eggs (room temp)
  • 1 tablespoon smooth apricot jam
  • 1 ¼ cups cake flour
  • 1 teaspoon bicarb of soda (5ml)
  • pinch salt
  • 2 tablespoons butter (30ml)
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar (15ml)
  • 125ml milk

The Sauce

  • 250ml cream
  • 125ml butter
  • 125ml sugar
  • 125ml water

INSTRUCTIONS

Set oven to 190°C

  1. Beat castor sugar and eggs until fluffy then beat in the jam until a creamy consistency
  2. Sift dry ingredients into separate bowl.
  3. Melt butter in a small pot on a medium heat and add the vinegar and milk
  4. Now add the above mixture (butter, milk, eggs) to the sifted ingredients and mix well. Now add the eggs mixture and combine well.
  5. Pour into an ovenproof casserole dish that takes about 2 liters.
  6. Bake at 190°C for 45 mins until the top is nicely browned.
  7. Melt all the sauce ingredients together in a small pot over a medium heat and pour over the pudding before serving, preferably while it’s still hot.
  8. Serve it with ice-cream or custard or both.

Making and Mixing

Camping brings its limitations on what you can take along.  So a large mixing bowl and whisks and various measuring cups aren’t exactly top priorities. img_1322

I generally keep a 125ml measuring cup and a rubber whisk in my camping kit.  Ironically somehow my whisk had grown wings and disappeared, which was almost an epic fail as I hadn’t checked till we started prepping.  Nothing worse than lumpy mixture…eugh!  And it is not like shops are right around the corner either. For your mixing bowl, you can use your general cooking pot to mix if you don’t have space for a plastic one.  Wendy was a she-Gyver (a better version of McGuyver) though and we used her shake mixer which worked a charm. This trip was only a week away, so we had more space in the trailer which enabled me to bring along my little scale to make my life easier.

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Another staple I now take along is baking paper.  There will invariable be a spot or two that gets a bit burned, whether it be with bread, potato bake or your pudding.  And cleaning these pots can be a pain, especially if you have limited water.  So lining with baking paper make a messy job so much easier to deal with.

Side note: if you crunch the baking paper up into a ball before using it to line whatever dish, it is then so much easier to manage.  You can then fit it in to the edges etc and it doesn’t keep curling out of the dish  🙂

Ready, set and cook

Your batter is prepared, your coals are ready and your dish is lined.   Pour your batter into your pot and pop it on your small stones over some coals near the fire.  If you have some larger warm rocks, put those on the outside and then pop some coals on the lid.  You will need to monitor and change out the coals underneath and on top and rotate the pot so that alternating sides are near the fire.  Again, you need far fewer coals underneath than you think.  You can always add more heat as you go rather than starting too hot.  It will take roughly an hour…well mine did.  Don’t forget to prep the sauce so you don’t have to scramble when it comes off the fire.

A great time to put it on is just before you start braaing.  It will then be ready after supper so that when you finish eating dinner you can take it off the fire and pour on the sauce, put the lid back on and eat when ready.

Eat and Enjoy!!!!

I hope you are in a beautiful place with an amazing view and fabulous company and that this brings a little bit of home with you.

Good luck and let me know if there are any other amazing recipes that are easy and yummy that can be done on the fire.

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The kids were just SLIGHTLY stoked to have pudding while camping

This recipe and the Breakfast in the Bush were cooked on our trip to the Tankwa National Park.  A truly incredible place with limited to no cell reception, beautiful vistas and stars that feel like they are right within reach.  I can’t recommend it enough.  We bush camped for a night and felt humbled by the beauty that surrounded us.

I hope you experience God’s beauty and majesty this year while adventuring and exploring this amazing place we get to call home.

Some pics from the Tankwa xxx

 

 

 

Breakfast in the Bush – yummy eggs

Bullets and Beans

Last month at the amazing Desert Knights Mountain Bike adventure I got to meet the wonderful Marion Sieberts. IMG_0755

If you have done the Mapangubwe Wildrun (now that is one for the bucket list) or many other amazing wild sporting adventures, then you would have eaten her delicious food.

Anyway, on the morning at the Orange River, she opens up the Pooitjie pot on the fire and this aroma comes out that has us all salivating.

It didn’t look like much but oh my word it was so yummy.  After getting this simple but delicious recipe that she dubbed Bullets and Beans, I had to try it out the next week when we were camping in the Tankwa Karoo National Park.

I had a very hard to please crowd, my kids and their friends.  The joy of dealing with kids is that they are ruthless with their critique and opinion and are very bad at faking it if they don’t like the taste of something.  So to say I presented a breakfast with baked beans and boiled eggs in it with slight fear and trembling would be putting it mildly.  My mum is from the UK, so I grew up with baked beans on toast as a staple Sunday night dinner but my kids are not such huge fans.

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Our beautiful bush camp in the Tankwa Karoo National Park

Anyway, as we were in the middle of the Karoo bushcamping in this exquisite valley and it was Simon’s birthday, I got up early and quickly put Bullets and Beans together.  It had to be quick and easy as the temperature was about to rise over 40degrees celsius and we still had to pack up camp.

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I had boiled the eggs the night before, so that made the process quicker and easier.  At Desert Knights, Marion had served boiled eggs for breakfast the day before and then used the leftover eggs for the Bullets and Beans the following morning.  So when camping remotely or moving camp daily, its little things like these that makes your life easier.

If you have a bit more time, making fresh Irish soda bread in the pan would be an absolutely delicious accompaniment (recipe here).  Otherwise, wraps would also work well as they travel brilliantly for those really remote trips. (overland shopping list guide).

We just did it with normal toast as I didn’t have a lot of time.  Well, the kids absolutely loved it!  The leftovers were even eaten for lunch the next day!  So Bullets and Beans will be added to my quick yummy breakfast camping list along with flapjacks, vanilla oats and the usual bacon and eggs.

So here is the recipe for a really easy yummy breakfast!

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Marion’s Bullets and Beans

Ingredients

1 onion

celery (I forgot mine and still was delicious)

1 tin tomatoes

1 tin bakes beans

eggs (depends how many you want)

Onion flakes (I used from Woolies)

Method

Chop up onion into small pieces and fry until lightly golden and translucent and add your celery  (you can add garlic too, but I forgot…yes this as well)

Add tin of tomatoes and let simmer while you peel the eggs, giving the occasional stir.

Once peeled add baked beans and eggs to the tomato mixture.  As needed to taste, add salt and pepper and some fresh herbs if you have and like.  I had some leftover bacon bits, so we added this to the mixture which was delicious.  You can pretty much do anything!

Serve on toast and adding the crispy onion once dished is the not to be missed final ingredient.

I doubled the above quantity for 7 and we had some leftovers which the kids gobbled for lunch the next day.

So, it doesn’t look or sound like much but it is yummy, wholesome and easy.  Give it a try next time you are camping and want something a little different.

Happy travels!

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It’s the Little Things that count

Just because you’re in the middle of nowhere doesn’t mean you have to suffer.  I have come to realize that when you are out in these remote amazing places it is the little things which just ‘make it’.

 

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Finding a small shop in the middle of nowhere and getting some ‘luxuries’.  Below is a picture of the shop….we nearly missed it

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So here are some of my non negotiables to making all things good while camping:

  • Good coffee – thank God for aeropress
  • Good wine – pack more red than white so don’t have to worry about chilling
  • Good food – you can do more than just braai on a fire
  • Clover full cream or low fat long life milk tastes the best (it doesn’t kill the taste of your Rooibos tea)
  • A comfy pillow – I will sacrifice clothes for my pillow
  • A sheet or kikoi to sleep on – it really makes a difference
  • My Paez shoes – they pack flat, light and are closed! Socks and takkies can get very hot but slip slops aren’t always practical and your feet get dirty
  • Facial wipes – means I can wear some make up 🙂
  • The solar shower bag – nothing better than a shower after a dusty day
  • My kindle
  • Good music
  • A good comfortable camping chair (a lot of time is spent sitting round the fire)

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Beer Bread on the Fire

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My friend, Elaine, gave me the yummiest beer bread recipe ever!  There is never any left and generally it gets eaten as soon as its sliced as it is completely irresistible.

Ingredients

3 cups flour

1 tsp baking powder

1/2 cup sugar (this just makes it delicious)

1 beer – preferably one of the stronger ones like Black Label

Method

Throw dry ingredients together and add the beer – not complicated at all!

Oil the bread pot well or spray and cook it

Add the mixture

To Cook

Do not put the pot right on the coals in the fire, it will burn!  We did that the first few times and it is not easy cleaning a burnt pot while bushcamping with limited water.  You will need far less coals than you expect as those cast iron bread pots get extremely hot.  Rather start with too few and add.  We put a few off to the side of the fire but close enought to still feel warmth.  Put coals underneath and a few on top.  These will need to be rotated a few times for fresh ones.  A pot hook is quite useful for taking the lid off to check how it is cooking but brush the coals off first.  I have tried a few times to think I could just lift it up and then put it back on and invariable the ash falls onto the bread!  Don’t forget to rotate the beer bread around as well so the sides get even warmth from the fire.  It takes roughly 45mins-1hr to cook.

Enjoy!

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