Breakfast in the Bush – yummy eggs

Bullets and Beans

Last month at the amazing Desert Knights Mountain Bike adventure I got to meet the wonderful Marion Sieberts. IMG_0755

If you have done the Mapangubwe Wildrun (now that is one for the bucket list) or many other amazing wild sporting adventures, then you would have eaten her delicious food.

Anyway, on the morning at the Orange River, she opens up the Pooitjie pot on the fire and this aroma comes out that has us all salivating.

It didn’t look like much but oh my word it was so yummy.  After getting this simple but delicious recipe that she dubbed Bullets and Beans, I had to try it out the next week when we were camping in the Tankwa Karoo National Park.

I had a very hard to please crowd, my kids and their friends.  The joy of dealing with kids is that they are ruthless with their critique and opinion and are very bad at faking it if they don’t like the taste of something.  So to say I presented a breakfast with baked beans and boiled eggs in it with slight fear and trembling would be putting it mildly.  My mum is from the UK, so I grew up with baked beans on toast as a staple Sunday night dinner but my kids are not such huge fans.

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Our beautiful bush camp in the Tankwa Karoo National Park

Anyway, as we were in the middle of the Karoo bushcamping in this exquisite valley and it was Simon’s birthday, I got up early and quickly put Bullets and Beans together.  It had to be quick and easy as the temperature was about to rise over 40degrees celsius and we still had to pack up camp.

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I had boiled the eggs the night before, so that made the process quicker and easier.  At Desert Knights, Marion had served boiled eggs for breakfast the day before and then used the leftover eggs for the Bullets and Beans the following morning.  So when camping remotely or moving camp daily, its little things like these that makes your life easier.

If you have a bit more time, making fresh Irish soda bread in the pan would be an absolutely delicious accompaniment (recipe here).  Otherwise, wraps would also work well as they travel brilliantly for those really remote trips. (overland shopping list guide).

We just did it with normal toast as I didn’t have a lot of time.  Well, the kids absolutely loved it!  The leftovers were even eaten for lunch the next day!  So Bullets and Beans will be added to my quick yummy breakfast camping list along with flapjacks, vanilla oats and the usual bacon and eggs.

So here is the recipe for a really easy yummy breakfast!

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Marion’s Bullets and Beans

Ingredients

1 onion

celery (I forgot mine and still was delicious)

1 tin tomatoes

1 tin bakes beans

eggs (depends how many you want)

Onion flakes (I used from Woolies)

Method

Chop up onion into small pieces and fry until lightly golden and translucent and add your celery  (you can add garlic too, but I forgot…yes this as well)

Add tin of tomatoes and let simmer while you peel the eggs, giving the occasional stir.

Once peeled add baked beans and eggs to the tomato mixture.  As needed to taste, add salt and pepper and some fresh herbs if you have and like.  I had some leftover bacon bits, so we added this to the mixture which was delicious.  You can pretty much do anything!

Serve on toast and adding the crispy onion once dished is the not to be missed final ingredient.

I doubled the above quantity for 7 and we had some leftovers which the kids gobbled for lunch the next day.

So, it doesn’t look or sound like much but it is yummy, wholesome and easy.  Give it a try next time you are camping and want something a little different.

Happy travels!

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Desserts in the Desert

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There is nothing nicer than being in the middle of nowhere and being able to have a pudding that is more than toasted marshmallows.  Don’t get me mistaken, my kids LOVE toasted marshmallow squished between two Marie biscuits with Nutella.  It is my quick go-to treat when camping but a warm pudding can’t be beaten.  My son Jesse absolutely loves apple crumble and it is the biggest treat when away.  It’s also really easy to take along on long trips as tinned apples work perfectly well and the makings for the crumble just need butter brought.  It’s been a bit of a hit and miss trying to get the crumble to be more crumble like and not turn cakey.  So I have finally managed to get it right!  So here are my tricks.

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We love to throw peaches or apricots in with the apples for added yumminess

Firstly, when putting your fruit into the pot try to not add any of the juice or as little juice as possible.  This will minimize the amount of moisture lessening the steaming effect. With regards to what to use, cast iron works well but be careful not too much heat.  I have a standard Cadac pot which I prefer over my bread pot as the fruit doesn’t stick.  The crumble must not be too thick on top either.  And then the final winner, instead of putting a sealed lid on top, you put a few layers of tinfoil.  Pierce holes around the outside quite close to the edge.  This lets steam escape while still being able to put coals in the middle.  The first time I let the coals burn down and then ash fell through the holes.  So rather use larger coal pieces and rotate them.  We always take the heavy duty tinfoil on our trips, so if you have the lighter stuff be careful.

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Our first attempt with tinfoil.  Credit goes to my brilliant friend Nena, who suggested it after I moaned about the steaming!

 

It takes roughly 45mins to an hour and you need to rotate it so that all the sides get the fire heat too.  As with making bread on the fire, you just need an even spread of light coals underneath the pot.  Again, rather have too few and add a bit more than start too hot and burn it.  You will need to replace the top and bottom coals a few times during this time.  I generally make the apple crumble before prepping the rest of dinner and as soon as the fire is lit.  This is because it can go on the outside while the fire is burning down for the braai.  Any leftovers are great for breakfast the next day!

So here is my recipe.  It is more of a basic guideline.  I am no chef and more of a taste as I go and adjust.  So try it out, change it up and share with good company in beautiful places.

RECIPE

I generally make for roughly 4 adults and 4/5 kids

2 large tins apples

1 tin peaches or apricots

Drain all the juice and put in the pot.  There should be an even covering on the bottom of the pot.

If the apples are sugar free you may need to sprinkle some sugar on

You can add cinnamon sugar and raisins depending on your kids and friends

For the crumble:

4 tblsp soft butter

8 tblsp stone ground flour

6 tblsp sugar

I add some oats as we like how it makes it a bit chewy

Mix together with your fingers until the consistency is ‘crumbly’.  My standard test is if I squeeze some in my hand that it can stick together.

 

Put it over the top of the fruit.  You want a good covering but maximum of 1.5cm thick.  I then put a light sprinkling of cinnamon sugar on top.  Cook until golden on the coals next to the fire.

 

Irish Soda bread in a pan

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Our recent trip to the Richtersveld was magical and this is a pic from our buschcamp at the fluospar mine.

When you are in the middle of nowhere your options for buying bread at a corner shop are….well….not possible.  So you are either left with stale Woolies rolls which last so long because I dread to think what is in them.  Otherwise dry provitas or rice crackers….which lose their appeal after a few days.  Wraps last pretty long and are lovely with salads and veg.  Again, fresh ingredients are limited in the middle of nowhere and there is only so much tuna mayo you can eat in a wrap before gagging.

We do have a cast iron bread pot, but by the time you have set up camp and got supper ready the last thing you feel like doing is kneading bread and leaving to rise etc.  I always have these grand ideas to make bread everyday and pre kids I did it quite a lot on our trips.  But the reality with kids and camping make it seriously unlikely.  My time is now spent finding toys left in cliff holes or rounding up kids from chasing the locals goats up the mountain or stopping them from scorpion hunting without gloves..  The glamorous life of parenting!

Yet again my friend Elaine came to my rescue!  She gave me the amazing beer bread recipe.  I was moaning about the limited option while chatting through logistics on one of our sanity cycles (she is my cycling partner, so many hours are spent together on our bikes).  She then said her family had a recipe, one of those passed down from the grandmother to mother, where you make a semi flat soda bread in the pan and it all mixes together in one bowl and no rising and kneading needed.  I begged and pleaded and promised lots of chocolate in repayment for the recipe.  Woohoo!

So I tried it on our recent trip to the Richtersveld and it was amazing…well the third attempt was.  In typical me fashion I didn’t read the recipe properly.  I was so eager I scanned over it and assumed by the name that baking soda was used….a whole whopping two teaspoons!  The first ‘loaf’ looked amazing and I thought it smelt a little strong, but without trying it I promptly made a second (we were having bacon and eggs for breakfast).  My husband sneaked past and nabbed a piece…and promptly nearly threw up.

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It tasted disgusting!!!!!  I re read the recipe and suddenly realized it was baking powder and not baking soda.  Stupid name!!!!  It was also a weird yellow color when done with the baking soda but I had ignored that as well.

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Anyway, attempt 3 and 4 worked out a dream and what a brilliant, quick and tasty bread.  I made it a few times on our recent Richtersveld holiday.  So without much ado, here is the recipe:

INGREDIENTS

2 Cups Flour

2 tsp Baking POWDER

pinch of salt

(mix dry ingredients through with a fork)

270ml warm milk

(will flop if milk isn’t warm)

METHOD TO MAKE

Put all dry ingredients in, run a fork through and add the warm milk.

Mix together using a spoon.

I used a 25cm pan and I lightly olive oiled it but you can use butter too.  We just didn’t have much for our trip.

Pour batter into pan.  It will sort of lump in the middle.  I then dusted my hands in flour and could then spread it out on the pan with my fingers.  You sort of work it outwards.  Put over a medium to low heat and cover and leave.  When the sides start to look more ‘cooked and firm’ and you can get a spatula under, then flip.  Roughly 5mins a side….very roughly as I never timed it.

Then slice horizontally and eat warm with whatever you have available or wrap in tinfoil and keep for lunch.

I made 2 ‘loaves’ and they comfortably served 4 adults and 5 kids.  You cut the loaf into 4 triangles and then in half horizontally.  You then get 8 ‘slices’ per loaf.

As I said before, it’s the small things that make trips to remote areas heaven 🙂